Install this theme
aubreyrenee:

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.

aubreyrenee:

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.

plantedcity:

Infographic: Home gardening in the USA
Source: MNN

plantedcity:

Infographic: Home gardening in the USA

Source: MNN

gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Via contained:

Localize It: PodPonics Grows High-Tech Organic Produce In Shipping Containers — Fast Company

 As fuel prices go up, the cost of shipping produce thousands of miles away rises accordingly. In the past few years, a number of companies have attempted to capitalize on the increasing hunger for locally produced food — we’ve seen rooftop farming startup BrightFarms and Brooklyn hydroponic farming startup Gotham Greens, just to a name a couple. 
[Atlanta-based] PodPonics started in 2010 when founder Matt Liotta — a serial entrepreneur who has launched Internet, software, and telecom startups — noticed that demand significantly outstripped supply in the local food business. “[My work] in Internet, telecom, and agriculture is all pretty similar in that the goal was to find a mature industry and come up with a disruptive technology,” he says. “If you wanted to produce fresh produce at the point of consumption in a way that was economically viable, what would you have to invent to do it?”
Liotta decided to use recycled shipping containers as “grow pods,” which are outfitted with organic hydroponic nutrient solutions; computer-controlled environmental systems to regulate temperature, humidity, pH levels, and CO2; and lights that emit specific spectrums at different points in the day. The system provides the exact amount of water, lights, and nutrients that a crop requires—so there is no wasted energy (though the pods are still hooked up to the power grid). In a 320 square foot area, PodPonics can produce an acre’s worth of produce. The pods can be stacked on top of each other for more efficient use of space.

Full story: Fast Company. Photo via PodPonics.

gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Via contained:

Localize It: PodPonics Grows High-Tech Organic Produce In Shipping Containers — Fast Company

 As fuel prices go up, the cost of shipping produce thousands of miles away rises accordingly. In the past few years, a number of companies have attempted to capitalize on the increasing hunger for locally produced food — we’ve seen rooftop farming startup BrightFarms and Brooklyn hydroponic farming startup Gotham Greens, just to a name a couple. 

[Atlanta-based] PodPonics started in 2010 when founder Matt Liotta — a serial entrepreneur who has launched Internet, software, and telecom startups — noticed that demand significantly outstripped supply in the local food business. “[My work] in Internet, telecom, and agriculture is all pretty similar in that the goal was to find a mature industry and come up with a disruptive technology,” he says. “If you wanted to produce fresh produce at the point of consumption in a way that was economically viable, what would you have to invent to do it?”

Liotta decided to use recycled shipping containers as “grow pods,” which are outfitted with organic hydroponic nutrient solutions; computer-controlled environmental systems to regulate temperature, humidity, pH levels, and CO2; and lights that emit specific spectrums at different points in the day. The system provides the exact amount of water, lights, and nutrients that a crop requires—so there is no wasted energy (though the pods are still hooked up to the power grid). In a 320 square foot area, PodPonics can produce an acre’s worth of produce. The pods can be stacked on top of each other for more efficient use of space.

Full story: Fast Company. Photo via PodPonics.

gardensinunexpectedplaces:

A “mobile garden dress,” created by environmental artist Nicole Dextras for the Vancouver International Children’s Festival.

The Mobile Garden Dress was conceived as a self-sustaining garden and portable shelter for the new urban nomad, complete with pots of edible plants and a hoop skirt that converts into a tent at night. This garment is 100% compostable and recyclable.

(via Soiled and Seeded)

gardensinunexpectedplaces:

A “mobile garden dress,” created by environmental artist Nicole Dextras for the Vancouver International Children’s Festival.

The Mobile Garden Dress was conceived as a self-sustaining garden and portable shelter for the new urban nomad, complete with pots of edible plants and a hoop skirt that converts into a tent at night. This garment is 100% compostable and recyclable.

(via Soiled and Seeded)

i12bent:

W. Eugene Smith: A Walk to Paradise Garden, 1946
“Smith’s war wounds cost him two painful years of hospitalization and plastic surgery. During these years he took no pictures and whether he would ever be able to return to photography was doubtful. Then one day, during his period of convalescence, Smith took a walk with his two children and even though it was still intensely painful for him to operate a camera, came back with one of the most famous photographs of all time: “A Walk to Paradise Garden.” This memorable image was to serve as the final picture in the famous “Family of Man” Exhibition.” (Source)

i12bent:

W. Eugene Smith: A Walk to Paradise Garden, 1946

“Smith’s war wounds cost him two painful years of hospitalization and plastic surgery. During these years he took no pictures and whether he would ever be able to return to photography was doubtful. Then one day, during his period of convalescence, Smith took a walk with his two children and even though it was still intensely painful for him to operate a camera, came back with one of the most famous photographs of all time: “A Walk to Paradise Garden.” This memorable image was to serve as the final picture in the famous “Family of Man” Exhibition.” (Source)

diynot:

Nice and simple.  I think lining them with some builders fabric (wire mesh with ~1cm x 1cm openings and figuring out a front enclosure would be good additions.  Might need some supports or bracing to make sure the sides don’t get pushed out when the compost gets piled high.
thechowderhead:

We now have a 2-bin compost system!  The pallets were free, the zip-tie fasteners ran me about 25 cents, and it took less than 15 minutes to build.

diynot:

Nice and simple.  I think lining them with some builders fabric (wire mesh with ~1cm x 1cm openings and figuring out a front enclosure would be good additions.  Might need some supports or bracing to make sure the sides don’t get pushed out when the compost gets piled high.

thechowderhead:

We now have a 2-bin compost system! The pallets were free, the zip-tie fasteners ran me about 25 cents, and it took less than 15 minutes to build.